Obsessive love

Dear reader, I’m in love! Or maybe “obsessed” is more accurate. The lucky bastard: Dick Vincent. A Manchester-based illustrator – whose work you may have seen in Flow Magazine par exemple – that won my heart about a year ago with his watercolour-illustrations. And since then I follow him where ever he goes: Instagram, Etsy, facebook… *sighs*
I’m drooling all over his work and desperately heart every picture he posts to Instagram. But when he posted the new print of “The Log Lady” from Twin Peaks (the series is returning in 2016!) he really set me on fire. Whoooosh! I mean, that clearly means he and I are meant to be – if he loves Twin Peaks and its characters then I don’t need any more proof.

Twin Peaks' Log Lady by Dick Vincent

Twin Peaks’ Log Lady by Dick Vincent

But before Dick Vincent is requesting a restraining order to stop me from getting any nearer, let me be clear: I’m exaggerating of course. However, I do love his work immensely. The dry sense of humour, a certain love for pets and other animals, simple yet (mostly) colourful and detailed – I can’t stop looking at him, er…it. With his amazing fantasy Vincent – who graduated from Manchester Metropolitan University in 2007, having studied Illustration with Animation – always manages to put a smile on my face.

The best people love cats and dogs. Another of Vincent's prints.

The best people love cats and dogs. Another of Vincent’s prints.

In the new year (currently December-broke even though it’s only November) I’m gonna treat myself to the fantastic print of the Twin Peaks‘ Log Lady. Excited already! Dick also showed us a little painting of Twin Peaks director David Lynch on his blog, so I’m hopeful this means the start of a Twin Peaks series of portraits. I would love to have Cooper, Harold the Orchid man, Andy, Lucy , Leo “New Shoes” and Nadine on my wall too. Do it for me Dickie, do it for me!
If not, I’ll expand my Vincent-collection with the pictures of Mark Twain and his marvellous friends. All is fine by me, really Dick. Just promise me to never give up on illustrating. And tell me you love me… my! Christmas cards too.

Who doesn't want this Peruvian farmer and his larma on the wall?

Who doesn’t want this Peruvian farmer and his larma on the wall?

 

 

Discipline and the diary

November is all about drawing. It’s my focus this month. And not only up here at Tessie’s Projects, also in my non-digital daily life drawing is taking over. A serious project! More on that will follow. ASAP.

I’m no illustrator, have no serious talent when it comes to paper and pencil. But I like drawing (or in my case more scribbling and doodling). I like the idea of being able to draw. Being able to sketch what I see, even. Giving form to the ideas that hide in my head by putting pencil on paper. For my study Interior Design it is handy to have or develop sketching skills, too. It’s ideal if you’re able to quickly sketch the ideas of your client, for instance. So I try my hand at drawing, sometimes. The best way to develop sketching skills is the simplest way: start sketching. Every day. Not for 5 hours. Just one thing a day. A simple thing to start with. A mug. Your telly. Knives, forks. Whatever. Easy peasy. Child’s play.

But not for me. As always, when I have to (no, want to) practise things such as sketching, I start doubting myself. Get scared even. And to prove myself that indeed I won’t be able to, I set the bar too high. So I can’t reach. Easy peasy! Mostly this results in not doing it at all – procrastination. My favourite hobby. Tomorrow. Tomorrow. I love you. Tomorrow.
Same with writing. The ideas are enormous and are fired at me by my brain. I can’t keep up. So I stop before I even start. Even a simple diary must be a master piece. Let me illustrate (did you see that one coming?) this: in March 2013 I started a diary, inspired by a tip I read in some book. The tip was perfect, especially written for me: Just write one sentence a day in your one-sentence-a-day-diary. No pressure at all. And so I went to a cheap shop. Bought myself a cheap notebook. And a cheap ribbon. And I started. Of course I added an accompanying sketch a day to the just-one-sentence. To practice my sketching skills. Otherwise the bar would be too low.

It’s a shoe! A day, a sentence, a sketch.

 

It didn’t even last a month.

As it’s now November and I’ve sworn to draw a lot this month, I dug up the one-sentence-a-day-diary. And I’m gonna do it again. Every day. One sentence. One sketch. I’ll report to you.

To keep up the good work I often seek inspiration on the internet. There’s a lot of illustrators to be found, all unique and independent. It’s always inspiring take a good look at their technique, their fantasy, their solutions. Also, sketching-diaries are booming at the moment. Just type “visual journal” or “visual diary” on google and you’ll get results aplenty. My favourite isn’t a contemporary, however. It’s Christiaan Andriessen, who drew in his diary daily from 1805 – 1808. Trendsetter he! The book “De wereld van Christiaan Andriessen” (in English “The world of Christiaan Andriessen”) is the publication of this 19th century Dutch artist’s diary.

Christiaan Andriessen

From the trendsetter’s diary. Christiaan Andriessen.